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06/16/2013

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J. Reed Anderson

I remember this argument about 20, 25 years ago. I did some temporary work just out of college with a friend of mine who was (is still) a hard rock geologist working for an exploration company looking for gold up in that area. Nickel and copper were mentioned then, too. I was still fairly given to environmental causes, and objected to mining. Times and and notions change most of us. Anyway, it was the opposition by unions, the DFL, and the metropolitan populace that began changing my thinking. That's a great statement, and true, from the former mayor. The wolf center, an offering to the 1%, was supposed to be "economic development." Some day the rest of the metropolitan area will realize that their property taxes keep the small towns and counties of Northern Minnesota afloat. And some day, I hope, the union die-hards on The Range will realize that the DFL has not been their friend in three decades.

John Pepple

I, too, initially supported the environmental cause. Later on, I realized that the most ardent environmentalists among my friends were the wealthier ones. The poorer ones had other things to think about.

J. Reed Anderson

Exactly, John. Exactly. I was fairly active in the DFL, and even in the rural county I lived, I saw this emergent divide between those who were comfortable, and those whom liberals were supposed champion. You've nailed it correctly with Rich People's Leftism. They had their jobs (often in rural areas, employed in some government) and the rest were too busy trying to scoot the wolf off the top step.

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